HLF Provides $140K in Grants to HDSB Schools

May 30, 2017 — Thousands of students of the Halton District School Board enjoyed new school resources this spring thanks to the generosity of community and corporate donors of the Halton Learning Foundation (HLF).

HLF, which raises money to enhance the educational experiences of students in the Halton District School Board, provided school grants worth $140,000 this year to more than 60 elementary and high schools in Burlington, Oakville, Milton and Halton Hills.

“Many schools have needs for tools and resources beyond what’s covered by provincial funding,” said Lesley Mansfield, executive director of HLF. “One of our mandates is to help schools bridge that gap by providing grants for equipment and programs that help engage kids in learning.”

  • 18 schools in Halton were able to purchase new musical instruments, including flutes, trumpets and ukuleles, art materials such as modelling tools and drawing tablets, and have opportunities to participate in band and dance performances.  
  • Five schools received environmental grants to help create outdoor learning classrooms or edible gardens and build students’ environmental awareness and stewardship.
  • 21 schools received funding to support mental health initiatives that promote healthy living or help students cope with stress.
  • 14 schools received funding to purchase iPads, Chromebooks, robotics kits and other technology to help provide students with 21st century skills.
  • 21 schools were able to encourage student health through the purchase of soccer balls, skipping ropes and gym shoes, and introduced programs that promote teamwork and cooperation.

Glenview Public School in Burlington used grant money from HLF to purchase robots for Kindergarten students.

“The impact of having this technology in the classroom has been phenomenal,” said teacher Christopher Butt. “The students are so much more engaged when they use the robots to help tell stories, and having them learn coding at such a young age helps set them up for success in a digital world.”

Butt said the robots have also proven to be valuable in helping students develop their collaboration and problem solving skills.